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​The 2019 Southeastern US Vegetable Crop Handbook is now available!! For a hard copy, please contact your local County Extension office (www.aces.edu).  An electronic copy (PDF) of the book can be downloaded at https://www.growingproduce.com/southeasternvegetablecropha…/


As we get started in a new year, resolutions abound and we set our sights on making improvements over the previous year. In conjunction, the mission statement of Alabama Extension is to 'enable people to improve their quality of life and economic well-being'. One main goal of the farm management Extension team is to reach more producers and enable them to improve the quality of their financial records. In 2018, we met with a number of producers and were encouraged by both the feedback and progress we made.

One question that's always important to answer is: why? Why would a producer care to maintain their financial information? There are several reasons but one major factor is simply being able to make good decisions for the farm. It's hard to fully understand a situation with incomplete information. In this regard, how could an owner know if the business is doing well or making money without an accurate record of what is happening? Other benefits include: having information necessary for other parts of the business, knowing the value of the business, support in case of an audit, and the ability to see and make changes over time.

Profitable producers generally are the ones able to make incremental changes to their business from year-to-year. Meaning a small reduction in cost and a small increase in revenue from last year could end up being the difference between making money or not. Good records enable producers to see areas where changes are possible and likely ways that the business can improve upon what they are currently doing. If you think you or someone you know could benefit from improving their farm financial records, reach out to your local Extension office.

As is typically the case, appointments and training received are at no-cost to anyone, part of the Extension mission of helping citizens without regard to compensation, ability / income of producers, or any other characteristic. Training can come in the form of a one-on-one meeting set up at a preferred date and time, or with enough interest classes can be held to accommodate up to 10 farmers in one meeting. Producers should leave with enough knowledge and know-how to set up a simple and effective system for tracking financial information. Again, if you think you or someone you know could benefit from improving their farm financial records, reach out to Kevin Burkett, Ksb0002@auburn.edu205-245-5365.

Kevin Burkett

Regional Extension Agent I – Farm & Agribusiness Management




Dr. Joe Kemble, Extension Vegetable Specialist, Dept of Horticulture, Auburn University/Alabama Extension

Dr. Jeremy Pickens, Extension Greenhouse Specialist, Dept of Horticulture, Auburn University/Alabama Extension

With the colder temperatures across Alabama, many growers are turning on their heaters for the first time. In about 2 to 3 weeks, we will start getting calls about suspicious damage appearing on their vegetable crops.  Over the past 20 plus years, greenhouse design and construction has greatly improved creating a tighter environment that does not allow outside air into nor inside air out of the greenhouse.  If you are using a heater that burns propane, natural gas, or oil, it is critical that these fumes from combustion of fossil fuels be vented to the outside of the house.  If there is a problem in your heating system, those gases will concentrate in your greenhouse causing problems even when they are at very low levels.  The chief culprit is usually ethylene.

Ethylene (C2H4) is an odorless, colorless gas, which acts as a plant hormone, altering the growth of many plants. Major losses caused by the ethylene can occur with many greenhouse crops including vegetables. Ethylene is a simple organic substance, which is highly active at low concentrations. Normally, as the concentration of gas increases, so does the degree of damage. The major source of ethylene is from combustion of fossil fuels often resulting from improperly adjusted or uncleaned greenhouse heating units, leaky gas lines, or exhausts from combustion engines. Significant losses to greenhouse growers from ethylene are reported each year and many more probably occur, but are not correctly diagnosed.

Ethylene Damage Symptoms

No other air pollutant causes a greater range of damage symptoms than ethylene gas. Symptoms include malformed leaves and flowers, thickened stems and leaves, lack of growth (stunting), abortion of flowers and leaves, bud and leaf abscission, and epinasty (drooping and curling of leaves). Plant species, temperature, duration of exposure, stage, and state of plant development, and ethylene concentration influence symptom expression.

Harmful levels and effects of ethylene have been determined for greenhouse vegetable crops that are typically grown in Alabama.

Effect of ethylene on selected greenhouse-grown plants. ​ ​ ​
CropEthyleneVisual Symptoms and Reference
Sensitivity RangeYConcentration and Exposure Time
Cucumber ​++ ​0.1 ppmLoss of chlorophyll
10 ppmSoftening fruit
Lettuce ​+++ ​0.05 to 0.01 ppmReduced leaf size and weight.
0.1 ppmRusset spotting on leaves.
Pepper++0.5 ppm for 72 hrs or 1.0 ppm for 12 hrsAbscission of leaves, flower buds, and immature fruit. Younger plants are more sensitive than more mature plants.
Tomato ​+++ ​0.05 to 0.01 ppmEpinasty, reduced leaf area, failure of plants to set fruit.
1 ppm in 3 hrsEpinasty (leaves pointed downward as if wilted, but the leaves are turgid).

Y "++": moderately sensitive; "+++": very sensitive

Tomato plants are highly sensitive to ethylene and exhibit a characteristic wilting (epinasty) which can be used as an indicator plant for ethylene. The leaf petiole of an epinastic tomato leaf is bent downward, as if it is wilted, however it is completely turgid to the touch, and the root system is healthy. Once exposure to ethylene ends, most plants which flower continuously resume normal leaf growth and flowering within 1 to 2 weeks. However, with a chronic exposure to ethylene, plants may not recover.

Preventing and Detecting Ethylene in the Greenhouse

When designing the greenhouse, loss due to ethylene can be minimized by physically separating the plants from engine exhaust from shipping trucks and combustion engine vehicles used for soil mixing. Ethylene contamination from ripening fruit, senescing plant materials, smoke, welding fumes, and poorly maintained greenhouse furnaces can also be controlled.

Concerns about Heating Units and CO2 generators. A common source of ethylene and one of the major problems involving total crop loss in greenhouses is ethylene from malfunctioning heating units or CO2 generators. Maintenance of heater, distribution tubing, vent stacks, louvers, and fuel lines must be inspected prior to use after a period on disuse. 

Heater System Maintenance. Be aware of deterioration that occurs over time to heaters and CO2 generators as well as the structural damage to the working components of the ventilation system. Exposing the heater to the elements, particularly in hot summers, can lead to rusting, cracking, and clogging of air intakes. Gas leaks resulting from cracked heat exchangers may allow harmful concentrations of ethylene to be released. Continual expansion and contraction of the metal in the heat exchanger of a furnace can stress the welds, producing cracks. Leaks at joints and seams can be detected by painting soapy water on them and looking for bubbles. Another method for detecting leaks is the placement of smoke bombs or furnace candles within the firebox. If light or smoke is observed, call a professional to inspect your equipment.

Heater Type. Growers must carefully consider the type of heater purchased. Greenhouse heaters can be vented or unvented. Unvented gas burners should not be used when growing greenhouse vegetables. 

Vented heaters also produce ethylene in the exhaust, but the exhaust flows to the outside through a vent stack. Vent stacks should be located away from trees and nearby buildings and should extend 2 feet or more above the top of the greenhouse. They should be terminated with at least 3 feet of vertical pipe equipped with a suitable cap. Vent pipes should be tight to reduce the chance of leaks and should be supported against the wind. Vent stacks should be checked periodically to make sure they are not blocked.

Oxygen Levels and Intake. Providing enough ventilation and intake of fresh air from outside the greenhouse is also critical. There should be 14 cubic feet of air for each cubic foot of gas burned or 1 square inch of vent cross-sectional area of opening from outside air should be provided for every 2,500 BTU capacity of the heater. The flame of the burner must be a clear blue. Yellow or orange flames indicate that there are impurities in the fuel or a wrong furnace setting. Some growers seal the ventilators completely at night in order to save heat, however, pollutant concentrations can rapidly build up without night venting. The installation of a pipe that takes in air when the furnace burner is ignited is advised.

Without enough oxygen, complete combustion does not occur, resulting in dangerous levels of ethylene, sulfur dioxide, and other gases. Oxygen can become depleted in 2 to 3 hours and lead to incomplete combustion when there is no venting.  In Alabama, it is common for greenhouse to go days without ventilation as days are overcast and cold night temperatures require continual heater operation.

Oxygen levels in the greenhouse are of primary concern when temperatures become cold and growers seal their houses tightly for heating efficiency. Whether a grower is burning gas, oil, or wood, a complex mixture of gases will be produced such as carbon monoxide, ethylene, nitrogen dioxide, or nitric oxide. If the fuel contains sulfur, sulfur dioxide is also produced. Plants are 5,000 times less sensitive to carbon monoxide than to ethylene, but humans are highly sensitive to carbon monoxide poisoning. Sulfur dioxide can cause chlorotic spots and bleaching of interveinal areas of plants.

Checklist. Check of all switches, belts, valves, bearings, motors, fans, thermostats, filters, pipes, and gas lines should be conducted prior to uses your heaters to ensure everything is working correctly.

Annual Heating Unit Checklist
ItemTo do
Heat ExchangerCheck for cracks. While the furnace is running, inspect for light penetration.
FurnaceCheck for leaks. Place a smoke bomb or furnace candle within the firebox.
Gas LinesCheck for leaks. Painting soapy water on the joints and seams.
Exhaust ChimneyCheck for leaks and obstructions.
Pilot LightClean pilot and orifice.
FlameMake sure the burner flame is clear blue. Yellow or orange flames represent impurities or a wrong setting.

If you see a problem, don't wait.  Contact you County Extension office at www.aces.edu

Adapted from "Ethylene: Sources, Symptoms, and Prevention for Greenhouse Crops" NC State University Horticultural Information Leaflet 530 (7/2000). 


Xentari Pyganic Tank-mix1.jpg

Whether you are a conventional or an organic vegetable producer, an integrated pest management or IPM strategy for the modern farm includes a multi-faceted approach consisting of pest prevention and control strategies that aim at reducing pest populations below threshold levels. Proper pest identification and scouting are critical initial steps that form the basis of a proper IPM practice. Indiscriminate use of conventional or organic insecticides have resulted in many cases of insecticide resistance. Cultural control as well as pest exclusion systems suitable for small and large operations are prevention tactics, while insecticides should always be the last resort. Since many organic insecticides are low-persistence products designed to be environmentally friendly, there are additional benefits to evaluating the synergistic effects of rotations and tank-mixes for controlling insect pests. We encourage producers to do their own on-farm tests to gain experience in using new premix insecticides or rotations according to the insecticide label. Growers should keep good spray records and compare multi-year observations for developing a long-term IPM plan.

 

Organic insecticide tank-mixes:

  • Xentari (Bt-product, Valent USA) and Pyganic (natural pyrethrin, Valent USA) form a great combination for caterpillar control. Xentari (Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai)-Pyganic tank-mix improves plants stands and quality of vegetables like tomatoes.
  • Based on past research on cabbages, Dipel (Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki) can also be tank-mixed safely with pyrethrin for significant caterpillar control. Read the next section on the proper use of surfactants when dealing with waxy-leaf crops.
  • Pyganic and Neem 7-Way (Georgia Organic Solutions) tank-mix can also reduce small caterpillars. This tank-mix can significantly reduce damage to crops like tomatoes close to harvest in low pest-pressure regions.
  • Neem 7-Way and Xentari tank-mix can provide significant protection to tomato fruits without phytotoxic effects. Neem oil applications may also help with low populations of whiteflies and aphids (immature stages).  
  • Effectiveness of tank-mixes or insecticide rotations with Bts is enhanced when applications are made inside high tunnels (protection from rain) or in cooler weather (fall crop production).

 

Few pointers for vegetable growers:

  • Use surfactants on leafy vegetables with a wax layer to increase insecticide retention on or below the leaf surface where insects hide. Some organic surfactants include SKH Sticker, Ag Aide and EcoSpreader (Brandt, Inc.). Check insecticide label before mixing a spreader/sticker for compatibility issues; when in doubt, use the spray mixture in a small area before treating large fields. 
  • Benefits from tank-mixes and rotations may occur after 3 to 4 applications with weekly assessment of pest population levels (need-based applications). Tank-mixes should not be used for pest "prevention" as that may result in the target pest becoming resistant to two products simultaneously and wipe out the natural enemies leading to new pest problems.  
  • Use caution while spraying pyrethrin and spinosad products around beneficial insects. While these products are organic, they are toxic to pollinators. Avoid spraying when winds are high, or when pollinators are active.

 

Sources of organic insecticides:  Always check the insecticide label on the manufacturer's website before purchase. Many single or premix insecticides are available from online retailers that include Arbico Organics, Gardens Alive, Seven Springs Farm, Forestry Distributing, Amazon, and many others. Make sure to check the expiration date on the package and product quality before mixing. Consult product labels for primary tank-mixing instructions. Do not store insecticide mixes in spray tank to prevent corrosion. Wash application equipment thoroughly after use to prevent cross-contamination and accidental crop damage due to misapplication. When in doubt, call the manufacturer and/or the retailer for product details.   

 

Use the New Organic Vegetable IPM Toolkit Slide Chart

A revised Organic Vegetable IPM Toolkit is now available for natural and organic farmers. This rectangular slide chart has sustainable IPM recommendations for over 20 major vegetable insect pest species and is a good starting point for beginning or transitioning growers. For a free copy, please email bugdoctor@auburn.edu, contact a commercial horticulture regional extension agent, or attend a beginning farmer workshop in Alabama. Funding for this IPM toolkit was provided by the USDA SARE, BFRD, and Specialty Crops Block Grant Programs. 

 

Was this article useful to you? Send your feedback now – click here or copy link https://auburn.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_39kZ3xAcNGesXwp. Thank you!

Funding: The research and educational activities were funded by various USDA-NIFA and Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries grant programs. Educational activities are carried out in an unbiased manner to benefit all producers across the state and the southeast.  

 

Ayanava Majumdar,

Extension Entomologist and

SARE Program Coordinator, Auburn University

 

Gary Gray and Sam Boring,

Regional Extension Agents


Xentari-Azera Rotation.jpg

Whether you are a conventional or an organic vegetable producer, an integrated pest management or IPM strategy for the modern farm includes a multi-faceted approach consisting of pest prevention and control strategies that aim at reducing pest populations below threshold levels. Proper pest identification and scouting are critical initial steps that form the basis of a proper IPM practice. Indiscriminate use of conventional or organic insecticides have resulted in many cases of insecticide resistance. Cultural control as well as pest exclusion systems suitable for small and large operations are prevention tactics, while insecticides should always be the last resort. Since many organic insecticides are low-persistence products designed to be environmentally friendly, there are additional benefits to evaluating the synergistic effects of rotations and tank-mixes for controlling insect pests. We encourage producers to do their own on-farm tests to gain experience in using new premix insecticides or rotations according to the insecticide label. Growers should keep good spray records and compare multi-year observations for developing a long-term IPM plan.

 

Organic insecticide rotations with single active ingredient (AI) and premixes:

  • When dealing with some tough insect pests, organic insecticide rotation can be critical compared to repeated applications of a single AI. Proper insecticide rotation can reduce cost by reducing the application frequency of expensive products and target multiple species.
  • Typically, we have seen a good insect control by alternating selective insecticides with a broad-spectrum product. Always check the need for additional spray applications to reduce undesirable environmental effects. Incorporating selective insecticides in a rotation schedule encourages natural enemy populations to rebound after using harsher products. For example, in leafy brassicas, using Bt products first is a good strategy when population pressure is low. Later applications can include pyganic or spinosad based products (e.g., Monterey Garden Insect Spray). Three to four alternating applications can provide significant cabbageworm, looper, and diamondback moth control in open field or high tunnel crops.  
  • If you have yellowmargined leaf beetles on brassicas, then early application of pyrethrin, spinosad or premix products such as Azera (neem + pyrethrins, Valent USA) or Botanigard Maxx (Beauveria bassiana insect pathogenic fungus + pyrethrins, BioWorks) are good options. As caterpillar pressure rises through the season, Bt-based insecticides can be part of the rotation.
  • In tomatoes and other summer crops, Bt-Pyganic or Bt-Azera rotations also improved plant stands compared to the untreated check, indicating successful caterpillar control in the early season that generally resulted in higher crop production levels later.

 

Few pointers for vegetable growers:

  • Use surfactants on leafy vegetables with a wax layer to increase insecticide retention on or below the leaf surface where insects hide. Some organic surfactants include SKH Sticker, Ag Aide and EcoSpreader (Brandt, Inc.). Check insecticide label before mixing a spreader/sticker for compatibility issues; when in doubt, use the spray mixture in a small area before treating large fields. 
  • Benefits from tank-mixes and rotations may occur after 3 to 4 applications with weekly assessment of pest population levels (need-based applications). Tank-mixes should not be used for pest "prevention" as that may result in the target pest becoming resistant to two products simultaneously and wipe out the natural enemies leading to new pest problems.  
  • Use caution while spraying pyrethrin and spinosad products around beneficial insects. While these products are organic, they are toxic to pollinators. Avoid spraying when winds are high, or when pollinators are active.

 

Sources of organic insecticides:  Always check the insecticide label on the manufacturer's website before purchase. Many single or premix insecticides are available from online retailers that include Arbico Organics, Gardens Alive, Seven Springs Farm, Forestry Distributing, Amazon, and many others. Make sure to check the expiration date on the package and product quality before mixing. Consult product labels for primary tank-mixing instructions. Do not store insecticide mixes in spray tank to prevent corrosion. Wash application equipment thoroughly after use to prevent cross-contamination and accidental crop damage due to misapplication. When in doubt, call the manufacturer and/or the retailer for product details.   

 

Use the New Organic Vegetable IPM Toolkit Slide Chart

A revised Organic Vegetable IPM Toolkit is now available for natural and organic farmers. This rectangular slide chart has sustainable IPM recommendations for over 20 major vegetable insect pest species and is a good starting point for beginning or transitioning growers. For a free copy, please email bugdoctor@auburn.edu, contact a commercial horticulture regional extension agent, or attend a beginning farmer workshop in Alabama. Funding for this IPM toolkit was provided by the USDA SARE, BFRD, and Specialty Crops Block Grant Programs. 

 

Was this article useful to you? Send your feedback now – click here or copy link https://auburn.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_39kZ3xAcNGesXwp. Thank you!

Funding: The research and educational activities were funded by various USDA-NIFA and Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries grant programs. Educational activities are carried out in an unbiased manner to benefit all producers across the state and the southeast.  

Ayanava Majumdar,

Extension Entomologist and

SARE Program Coordinator, Auburn University

 

Gary Gray and Sam Boring,

Regional Extension Agents


The Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries is pleased to announce a cost-share program for specialty crop growers to alleviate the cost associated with GAP/GHP certification.

Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) and Good Handling Practices (GHP) audits are voluntary inspections that evaluate how fruits and vegetables are produced, packed, handled, and stored. The goal is to ensure that food is produced in the safest manner possible to minimize risks of microbial food safety hazards.

The cost-share program will reimburse farmers that have successfully passed a GAP/GHP certification for 75% of the cost up to a maximum of $500 per year. 

"We are always looking for ways to help our state's producers grow and expand," said Commissioner John McMillan. "GAP/GHP certification is required by most schools, grocers, and wholesalers. By providing financial assistance, we are helping our farmers reach those markets."

Funds for this program are provided through the USDA Specialty Crop Block Grant Program. Reimbursements are available on a first-come, first-serve basis until the funds are depleted.

If you are interested in applying for the program or have questions, please visit agi.alabama.gov or contact Don Wambles at 334-240-7247 or don.wambles@agi.alabama.gov

 

Brittany Carter

Marketing and DevelopmentAlabama Dept. of Agriculture & Industries


 

 



The Alabama Cooperative Extension System will be teaching several private pesticide applicator training classes. These classes are designed for the farmers who need to take the private pesticide applicator test in order to purchase restricted use products. However, we will be discussing chemical safety and sprayer calibration at this class, so anyone who sprays pesticides on a large scale will benefit from this training, even if a restricted pesticide license is not needed.

On January 18th the class will be taught at the Coosa County Extension Office [(256) 377-4713], January 24th at the Randolph County Ag Center in Wedowee [(256) 357-2841], January 25th at the Macon County Extension Office [(334) 727-0340], January 29th at the Cleburne County Extension Office [(256) 463-2620], January 30th at the Talladega County Extension Office [(256) 362-6187], February 19th at the Lee County Extension Office [(334) 749-3353], February 20th at the Clay County Extension Office [(256) 354-5976], February 27th at the Chambers County EMA Office [(334) 864-9373], September 10th at the Tallapoosa County Extension Office [(256) 825-1050], November 6th at the Calhoun County Extension Office [(256) 237-1621], and December 4th at the Russell County Extension Office [(334) 298-6845].

The Chambers meeting begins at 8:00 and will end around 12 noon (EST). The Russell County meeting begins at 12:30 p.m. and will end around 4:30 p.m. (EST). All of the other classes begin at 8:00 a.m. and will end around 12 noon (CST). If you would like to attend any of these classes, please call the Extension office in the county you would like to attend to make a reservation.  

A fee of $20 will be charged for this training and testing. An additional licensing fee of $25 will be sent to the Department of Agriculture and Industries by the applicant. The licensing fee is not included in the training and testing fee. Please plan to pay with a check (checks are preferred) made out the Alabama Cooperative Extension System (ACES) in the amount of $20 or with the correct cash amount.

Remember to read and follow the label directions before applying pesticides. On our web site, we have information on pesticides that are labeled for certain crops, such as insects, disease, and weed control in turf, ornamentals, vegetables, fruit, forages, and other areas such as insects in wood structures. For people who spray large areas, remember that sprayer calibration is extremely important. Sprayer calibration is the process of figuring out how many gallons of water is being applied to a known area and making needed adjustments so that the correct volume of water is applied. The particular pesticide label will give a range of desired gallons of water per acre that is needed to be applied along with the recommended rate of pesticide. Simple math calculations and a little time are needed to properly calibrate a sprayer. If you need more information on sprayer calibration, just contact your local County Extension Office, or visit our web site at www.aces.edu and type sprayer calibration in the "Search Our Site" box.

 

Chip East

Regional Ext. Agent, Commercial Horticulture



Inspections for the Produce Safety Rule are coming in March of 2019!  Have you had training and are you ready for this inspection?  The Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries is offering free and voluntary On-Farm-Readiness-Reviews to help ensure our Alabama growers are ready for inspection. For more information about the Produce Safety Rule or to sign up for a readiness review, visit the ADAI website or contact Jean Weese at weesesj@auburn.edu or 334-844-3269.

The Food Safety Modernization Act – Produce Safety Rule (FSMA) was signed into law in 2011. It sets new standards for food handling across the entire food chain with rules for businesses ranging from farms and food processors to food shippers, importers, retailers, and others. It is the first federal food safety law that includes specific rules for produce farms.

FSMA represents a change in the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) approach to ensuring a safe U.S. food supply. Rather than reacting to instances of food borne illness or contamination, FSMA shifts the focus toward preventing contamination in food. All farms regardless of size, location, or commodity grown, can reduce food safety risk. 

The Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries (ADAI) is working with FDA through a cooperative agreement to advance efforts for a nationally integrated food safety system.  ADAI will achieve this through the education and outreach, planning and implementing our Produce Safety Program to encourage the safe production of fresh fruits and vegetables.  ADAI will work to promote understanding and compliance with the requirements of FDA's "Standards for the Growing, Harvesting, packing and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption" (commonly referred to as the Produce Safety Rule).

 

Jean Weese,

Professor and Extension Specialist

Associate Director, Food Systems Institute

 

Kristin Woods

Produce Safety Alliance



A Clean Day Program is planned for your area on December 14, 2018.  This program will allow you, at no cost, to bring up to 1,000 pounds of unwanted pesticides for safe and environmentally sound disposal.  Products that will be disposed of include pesticides, insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, and rodenticides.  If you have products that have lost registration, have illegible labels, are out of date, or any of the mentioned products that you cannot use, you are encouraged to take advantage of this program.  This will allow you to protect your health and the health of your employees as well as protect your property and the environment.

This includes Farmers, Pesticide Applicators, Pesticide Dealers, Pest Control Operators, and Nurseryman. The location is for Baldwin, Clarke, Conecuh, Escambia, Mobile, Monroe, and Washington Counties.

Remember, you will not be charged for disposal of up to 1,000 pounds of material, and there will be no questions asked as to why you have any product.

Funding for this year's event is limited, so registration forms will be considered on a first come-first served basis; first for residents of Baldwin, Clarke, Conecuh, Escambia, Mobile, Monroe, and Washington counties, then for other counties as long as funds are available. 

Please complete the Pesticide Registration Form and return the form to your local County Extension Office or fax it to Daniel (334) 240-7168 if you would like to participate.  Your local County Extension Office or Daniel must have your registration on or before the November 30, 2018 deadline for you to participate in Clean Day.

If you have more than 1,000 pounds of material, please contact Daniel Sheffield for special arrangements.  As a reminder, you will be contacted before the actual collection date with all the details, so it is VERY IMPORTANT that the form is completely filled with and adequate and accurate contact information.  Should you have any questions, please contact your local Extension office or Daniel at (334) 240-7236.

This program is conducted as a service to you and is a joint effort of the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries and the Alabama Cooperative Extension System.

PESTICIDE CLEAN DAY: IMPORTANT   INFORMATION

The maximum amount to be accepted per vehicle will not exceed 1,000 pounds. If you have more than 1,000 pounds of material please contact Daniel Sheffield, Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries, 334-240-7236, to see if special arrangements can be made for disposal of your unwanted pesticide products.

Materials that WILL be accepted include both known and unidentifiable pesticide waste, such as insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, and other products such as defoliants, adjuvants and growth retardants.

Products NOT accepted include, but are not limited to the following: explosives or ordinance materials, compressed gas cylinders, petroleum products (motor oil), paints, tires, medical waste, radioactive materials, dioxin precursors or seeds.

Tony L. Cofer

Program Director

Plant and Pesticide Division




Get Ready! The 2018 AFVGA Conference & Trade Show is just around the corner! 

Join us again this November 15 & 16 at the Clanton Conference and Performing Arts Center located at 850 Lay Dam Rd. Clanton, AL, 35045

Registration Information: We are very excited to announce AFVGA is passing on the savings to you! The registration cost to attend has been lowered!

  • Registration for Attendees: Conference & Trade Show will be $85 per person, $65 for spouse/guest and includes a one-year membership to the AFVGA.
  • Registration for Industry: Exhibitors & Vendors has been lowered to $300 per booth with two people attending and includes a one-year membership to the AFVGA. $40 for electricity, $65 for additional persons. Equipment display, and sale of products is allowed at the conference.
  • Registration for Non-profit, Agencies & Universities: Trade Show cost has been lowered to $200 per booth with two people attending and includes a one-year membership to the AFVGA. ($40 for extra electricity), $65 for additional persons.
  • Conference flash drive: $25 (contains presentations and videos that will be mailed after the conference).

More information can be found here.

 



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