The GrassRoots

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 ForestHER, a hands-on workshop for women who love the land, is set for Sept. 19-20 at Riverwood Farms in Cullman County. The workshop, will help women learn about forests and forest resource management in a relaxed, fun setting. Women participants will learn to read maps and measure and market timber and nontimber forest products, including wildlife.

Riverwood Farms, which is located at 7851 County Road 35, in Bremen, Alabama, will run from  8:30 a.m. until 7:30 p.m., Monday, Sept. 19 and from 8:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 20.

Anyone who loves nature and learning about the natural world is invited to attend. You don't have to own a lot of land. If you own even 1 acre, this workshop is for you.

The cost of the workshop is $65 and includes a workbook, refreshment breaks, lunch and dinner on Day One and refreshment breaks and lunch on Day Two. Seating is limited so preregistration is required.

To register online go to www.aces.edu/go/651. To register by phone, contact Kelly Knowles at (334) 844-1010 or by email at knowlkw@auburn.edu.

For more information or directions to Riverwood Farms, contact the Cullman County Extension Office at (256) 737-9386 or Norm Haley at (256) 630-4248 or nvh0001@aces.edu.

The workshop is sponsored by Alabama Extension, Abstar Land and Timber, L.L.C., and Forest Management Specialists, Inc. 


Alabama Extension 4-H Staff in Marengo County Recognized by County Commission

The Marengo County Commission recently recognized Alabama Extension professionals for their outstanding service to the county's 4-H program. The county staff received the Crystal Clover, which recognizes it as a 4-H Centennial Youth Initiative County.

Alabama Extension's Associate Director Dr. Paul Brown presented the award and medals of excellence to the 4-H Team.

"We established the Centennial Youth Initiative in 2014," Brown said. "We asked each county to put together a county 4-H team to develop a plan of work for the future that would get young people engaged as we move forward," Dr. Brown said. "The Marengo County 4-H program has grown by leaps and bounds in the last few years. It now has more than 800 members ages 9 to 18 and reaches more than 1,400 students in K-12 through all of its programs.

Marengo County is one of 22 counties in Alabama designated as a CYI county.

"CYI status is a great achievement for our 4-H team. I look forward to moving our program forward and working with the young people in our county," said Pam Stenz, Marengo County Extension coordinator.

In addition to the award of CYI county status, Beth Yates is now assigned as the full-time 4-H Club Foundation regional agent for Marengo County. The funding for this agent is provided by Alabama Extension and the 4-H Club Foundation. 

"All of the hard work of the past two years has come to a moment of celebration and reflection. The future looks bright as we focus our efforts on the 4-H programs in Marengo County," said Yates.

The Centennial Youth Initiative (CYI) is committed to developing 4-H programs in Alabama to increase access so that more youth can participate in the program, and to enhance the learning experiences  available to young people. The award is based on the following standards of excellence in Alabama 4-H programming:

  • Forming a unified Alabama 4-H team and program        
  • Utilizing consistent research-based curriculum resources
  • Diversifying delivery modes tailored to today's youth
  • Promoting plan-of-work development and teamwork at all levels
  • Aligning staff and position assignments to support program resources and delivery modes

 

 

 


The Cullman County Commission recently recognized Alabama Extension professionals for their outstanding service to the county's 4-H program. The county staff received the Crystal Clover, which recognizes it as a 4-H Centennial Youth Initiative County.

Alabama Extension Associate Director Dr. Paul Brown presented the award and medals of excellence to the 4-H Team.IMG_2268.JPG

"We established the Centennial Youth Initiative in 2014," Brown said. "We asked each county to put together a county 4-H team to develop a plan of work for the future that would get young people engaged as we move forward."

County Commissioner Garry Marchman presented a proclamation honoring Cullman County 4-H accomplishments.

"On behalf of the Cullman County Commission and as a former 4-H er, I want to express our appreciation for the efforts of the Cullman County Extension team in achieving CYI status.  We deeply appreciate their commitment to the youth of Cullman County and look forward to the continued growth of the 4-H youth program," he said. More than 1,500 youth were involved in Cullman County programs last year.

In addition to the award of CYI county status, James Conway will be assigned as the full-time 4-H Club Foundation regional agent for Cullman County. The funding for this agent is provided by Alabama Extension and the 4-H Club Foundation. 

"This new CYI status is going to allow us to increase our 4-H efforts in the county," said Tony Glover, county Extension coordinator. "We will be able to expand our 4-H programs to additional schools in the county and reach more youth."

Cullman County is one of 22 counties in Alabama designated as a CYI county.

The Centennial Youth Initiative (CYI) is committed to developing 4-H programs in Alabama to increase access so that more youth can participate in the program, and to enhance the learning experiences  available to youth. The award is based on the following standards of excellence in Alabama 4-H programming:

  • Forming a unified Alabama 4-H team and program        
  • Utilizing consistent research-based curriculum resources
  • Diversifying delivery modes tailored to today's youth
  • Promoting plan-of-work development and teamwork at all levels
  • Aligning staff and position assignments to support program resources and delivery modes

 

Alabama Cooperative Extension has named Joshua Melson as the new County Extension Coordinator for Lawrence County.  He will begin his new duties June 20.

Melson is a 2012 graduate of Auburn University, where he received a bachelor’s degree in Interdisciplinary Studies emphasizing Agriculture Leadership Studies and Education. He will complete his master’s degree in Agriculture Leadership from Auburn University in December.

“I look forward to the opportunity to serve as county extension coordinator for Lawrence County. My objective is to be a resource and servant to the wonderful citizens of Lawrence County,” said Melson.

Melson comes to Extension from the Alabama Farmers Federation, where he served as area director for seven counties. As area director, he served as a liaison between the state federation and local county federation board of directors and committees. He also served as a liaison between elected officials and the counties in regards to the Alabama Farmers Federation policies.

“Josh comes to ACES from a career with the Alabama Farmers Federation, which offered him the opportunity to develop a diverse professional background steeped in leadership, program development and marketing.  I am very excited about the innovative spirit he will bring to his new role as the County Extension Coordinator in Lawrence County,” said Stan Windham, assistant director, Program Operations and Innovations with Alabama Extension.

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The Lauderdale County Commission recently recognized Alabama Extension professionals for their outstanding service to the county’s 4-H program.
Dr. Gary Lemme, director of Alabama Extension, presented the Lauderdale County Extension team with a Crystal Clover, which recognizes the county as a 4-H Centennial Youth Initiative county and Awards of Excellence medals.  Lauderdale County is one of 22 Alabama counties designated as a CYI county.  
In addition to the award of CYI county status, Lauderdale County will get a full-time 4-H Club Foundation regional agent. The funding of this agent is provided by Alabama Extension and the 4-H Club Foundation. 
“It’s an honor to be able to work with these Extension professionals and see first-hand the impact that they are making in the lives of youth in Alabama,” said Lemme. “They have accomplished a lot this year within the county’s 4-H programming, which I am certain will impact youth for years to come.”
The Centennial Youth Initiative (CYI) is committed to developing 4-H programs in Alabama to increase access so that more youth can participate in the program, and to enhance the learning experiences that are available to youth. The award is based on the following standards of excellence in Alabama 4-H programming:
·       Forming a unified Alabama 4-H team and program        
·       Utilizing consistent research-based curriculum resources
·       Diversifying delivery modes tailored to today's youth
·       Promoting plan-of-work development and teamwork at all levels
·       Aligning staff and position assignments to support program resources and delivery modes 
Lemme said that the Lauderdale County 4-H program has excelled in forming a unified 4-H team and program, which has helped the staff diversify its delivery modes to better meet the needs of today's youth.
All four Lauderdale County Commissioners are former 4-H’ers. “4-H builds leaders, proof of our county commission,” Tilenius added.
“We are in grades four, five and six of Lauderdale County schools and in certain programs in Florence schools, but we certainly want to reach older students and expand the program we offer,” said Heidi Tilenius, Alabama Extension coordinator for Lauderdale County.
Ruthie Smith, a fifth grade student at Lauderdale County Elementary School and a 4-H member for two years told her 4-H story during the special ceremony. She thanked everyone for their support of 4-H in the county. She added that 4-H had provided her with fun and wonderful learning opportunities and that she had participated in some excellent projects. Some of her 4-H projects include Speak Up Alabama, Chef 4-H, Pig Squeal, Chick Chain, The World I See Photography, and The World I Imagine Photography. 
“I learned that self-discipline is one of the most important things in 4-H, as well as being responsible,” she said.  “I have learned that to be the best you have to practice, work hard and know your project.”  

The Marshall County Commission recognized Alabama Extension professionals for their outstanding service to the county’s 4-H program May 25. The county received the Crystal Clover, which recognizes Marshall County as a 4-H Centennial Youth Initiative County.

As Alabama Extension Director Dr. Gary Lemme presented  the award and medals to the 4-H Team, Commission Chairman James Hutcheson said the Commission was proud of the work 4-H is doing and to “keep up the good work.”

Eddie Wheeler, county Extension coordinator for Marshall County, said “The Marshall County 4-H team did not get to this point by ourselves. This designation as a 4-H Centennial Youth Initiative County is the result of a lot of hard work and dedication to 4-H.” “We are appreciative for the support and contributions of our partners. Marshall County 4-H is strong because of the support of our partners,” he said.CYI-1.jpg

Marshall County is one of 22 counties in Alabama designated as a CYI county.

In addition to the award of CYI county status, the county will be assigned a full-time 4-H Club Foundation regional agent. The funding of this agent is provided by Alabama Extension and the 4-H Club Foundation. 

Lemme said that the Marshall County program has excelled in forming a unified 4-H team and program, which has helped the staff diversify its delivery modes to better meet the needs of today's youth. More than 1,000 youth were involved in Marshall County programs last year.

“It’s an honor to work with these Extension professionals and see firsthand the impact that they are making in the lives of youth in Alabama,” said Lemme. “They have accomplished a lot, which I am certain will im pact youth for years to come.”

The Centennial Youth Initiative (CYI) is committed to developing 4-H programs in Alabama to increase access so that more youth can participate in the program, and to enhance the learning experiences that are available to youth. The award is based on the following standards of excellence in Alabama 4-H programming:

·       Forming a unified Alabama 4-H team and program        

·       Utilizing consistent research-based curriculum resources

·       Diversifying delivery modes tailored to today's youth

·       Promoting plan-of-work development and teamwork at all levels

·       Aligning staff and position assignments to support program resources and delivery modes​


Alabama Extension’s Wilcox County  office has a new County Extension Coordinator.  Tamika Glover began work May 1.
Dial has worked in the secondary education system for more than 15 years where she served in various teaching and supervisory positions at Alabama Southern Community College. For 12 months, she served as assistant interim campus director for the Demopolis campus.  She was responsible for the day to day operation of the campus; supervised faculty and staff, provided employee orientation, helped make class schedules and assisted students in decision making and problem solving.
Just prior to her employment with Alabama Extension, she was the team leader in Adult Education and Workforce Development instructor for Marengo County/Linden Adult Education Program.
 “Tamika has an extensive background as an educator and brings a wealth of knowledge and applicable leadership skills to her new role.  Welcome and best wishes Tamika” said Stan Windham, assistant director Program Operations & Innovations with Alabama Extension. 
Dial holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Management from Stillman College and a Master of Science degree In Continuing Education, specializing in counseling psychology, and an Education Specialist degree in counseling from the University of West Alabama .   
“I feel privileged and also honored to serve as Wilcox County Extension Coordinator.  I look forward to
working with local government and citizens in the county through programs that the Alabama
Cooperative Extension Services offers,” said Dial.

Alabama Cooperative Extension has named Carla Elston as the new County Extension Coordinator for Bullock County.  She will begin her new duties May 16.
 
Elston is no stranger to Extension, as she has been serving in the 4-H Foundation agent role in Butler and Lowndes counties since 2013.  As a 4-H agent, Elston made great strides in re-establishing the youth program to a viable and vibrant stature resulting in an increase of 50 percent of youth membership within her first year.
Elston also has more than 15 years of administrative and leadership experience within the non-profit and federal sectors.  Previous to becoming a 4-H agent, she was employed in the Public Affairs Division with the USDA and held positions as an Outreach Programs Manager, Development Director and Case Manager with Montgomery based non-profit organizations.  She currently serves on the Safe Harbor Child Advocacy Center board of directors.
“Elston is a dedicated, resourceful professional who brings a lot of valuable experience to the position of County Extension Coordinator,” said Stan Windham, assistant director of Program Operations Innovations at Alabama Extension.  “I look forward to seeing what she can bring to Bullock County,” he added.
 
Elston has a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Auburn University in Montgomery.  She succeeds Wil Golden, who has held the position of interim Extension coordination since January 2016, following the retirement of George Tabb.
 
“It is a honor to be a part of an organization that delivers high quality programs and helps communities find innovative solutions to address their needs,” said Elston.  “I will do my best to serve the Bullock County community by collaborating with community leaders to continue to make a positive, meaningful impact that matters to our citizens.”
 

2016-05-02 16.12.47.jpgOn May 2, the Cleburne County Commission recognized Alabama Extension professionals for their outstanding service to the county’s 4-H program.  The county was also given the recognition as a Centennial Youth Initiative County.
“Dr. Gary Lemme, director of the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, said “the motto of 4-H is Making the Best Better, and that is exactly what Cleburne County has done.”  Dr. Lemme presented the Extension staff with a Crystal Clover Award and medals of excellence.
There are 687 youth involved in high quality 4-H programs in Cleburne County
In addition to the award of CYI county status, Cleburne County will be assigned a full-time 4-H Club Foundation regional agent. The funding of this agent is provided by Alabama Extension and the 4-H Club Foundation. 
“There hasn’t been a fulltime 4-H agent in our county for decades,” so this new agent will come in handy,” said Debby Mathews, Extension coordinator for Cleburne County. The new agent will begin June 1. 
The Cleburne County program excelled in forming a unified 4-H team and program, which helped the staff diversify its delivery modes to better meet the needs of today's youth.
Twenty-two counties in Alabama have been designated as CYI counties.
The Centennial Youth Initiative (CYI) is committed to developing 4-H programs in Alabama to increase access so that more youth can participate in the program, and to enhance the learning experiences that are available to youth. The award is based on the following standards of excellence in Alabama 4-H programming:
·       Forming a unified Alabama 4-H team and program        
·       Utilizing consistent research-based curriculum resources
·       Diversifying delivery modes tailored to today's youth
·       Promoting plan-of-work development and teamwork at all levels
·       Aligning staff and position assignments to support program resources and delivery modes
 
 
 
 

On April 6, the Greene County Commission recognized Alabama Extension professionals for their outstanding service to the county’s 4-H program.  Alabama Congresswoman Terry Sewell was on hand to congratulate the 4-H team and celebrate its designation as a CYI county and Award of Excellence.

“It is an honor and a privilege for the Greene County 4-H Club Program to receive the Alabama Extension Centennial Youth Initiative Designation and Award of Excellence,” said Lovie Parks, Extension coordinator for the county. “This designation signifies that the 4-H Program in the county is addressing the needs of its youth today. We will continue to make 4-H the best program in Greene County.”

Paul Brown, Alabama Extension associate director, presented the Greene County Extension team with a Crystal Clover, which recognizes Greene County as a 4-H Centennial Youth Initiative county.  Greene County is one of 22 counties in Alabama designated as a CYI county.  

In addition to the award of CYI county status, Greene County, Elizabeth Yates was assigned as a full-time 4-H Club Foundation regional agent. The funding of this agent is provided by Alabama Extension and the 4-H Club Foundation. 

“It’s an honor to be able to work with these Extension professionals and see first-hand the impact that they are making in the lives of youth in Alabama,” said Brown. “They have accomplished a lot this year within the county’s 4-H programming, which I am certain will impact youth for years to come.”

The Centennial Youth Initiative (CYI) is committed to developing 4-H programs in Alabama to increase access so that more youth can participate in the program, and to enhance the learning experiences that are available to youth. The award is based on the following standards of excellence in Alabama 4-H programming:

 

  • Forming a unified Alabama 4-H team and program        
  • Utilizing consistent research-based curriculum resources
  • Diversifying delivery modes tailored to today's youth
  • Promoting plan-of-work development and teamwork at all levels
  • Aligning staff and position assignments to support program resources and delivery modes

 

 

 

 

 

Brown said that the Greene County program has excelled in forming a unified 4-H team and program, which has helped the staff diversify its delivery modes to better meet the needs of today's youth. 


 

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Congresswoman Terri Sewell, center, joined by Greene County 4-H club members.

 


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