Animal Science and Forages

 Content Query Web Part

  • Posted by: Courteney McNamee on 5/8/2017 11:29 AM

    ​Drought conditions pose various healthcare and management challenges for horse owners and managers. Conditions associated with drought such as, high temperatures, limited water, and scarce forages, create a harsh environment for horses to thrive in. Fortunately, there are ways to help horses maintain good health despite severe weather. Preparation is key! The following new timely information sheet, " Drought Preparedness for Hor[...]


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  • Posted by: Joyce Tredaway Tredaway on 4/30/2017 2:27 PM

    The following species of Verbena are present in Alabama, as documented in the Alabama Plant Atlas (Alabama Herbarium Consortium and The University of West Alabama).

     

     

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    Common name(s)Scientific name

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  • Posted by: Kim Mullenix on 5/4/2017 4:04 PM

    Grazing Management During Drought in Tall Fescue Systems - May 2017 - TI Sheet.pdf

    This Timely Information sheet provides recommendations on managing tall fescue stands in North Alabama follow[...]


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  • Posted by: Kim Mullenix on 5/1/2017 10:09 AM

    ​There has been an increasing interest in the use of baleage in beef cattle systems in Alabama. This information sheet summarizes the results of a 45-day backgrounding trial using baleage and co-product feeds for pre-conditioning beef calves. 


    ACES TI Baleage.pdf[...]


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  • Posted by: Courteney McNamee on 4/12/2017 10:43 AM

    ​Slobber syndrome ("slobbers"), or slaframine toxicosis, is a chemical irritation and mycotoxicosis resulting from the consumption of Rhizoctonia species-infected legumes, in which excessive salivation is the characteristic sign. However, it is important to note that "Sobbers" may also appear in horses from mechanical irritation, which may be caused by other plants with spines, burrs, or sharp awns on[...]


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  • Posted by: Joyce Tredaway Tredaway on 3/31/2017 12:45 PM

    aceslogo.jpgWEED SCIENCE SERIES [...]


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  • Posted by: Sarah Dickinson on 12/2/2016 5:17 PM

    Alabama counties have experienced increased levels of drought throughout this past summer and fall. To successfully survive drought conditions, producers must develop a plan that considers not only the present, but also the future. Developing a plan to preserve next year's calf crop is a key part of planning for a successful future. This article will explain the nutritional requirements of beef cows f[...]


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  • Posted by: Kim Mullenix on 11/16/2016 8:54 AM

    ​As Alabama continues to experience drought conditions across the state, many cattle producers are thinking about how they can economically feed cattle through the winter months. With limited rainfall, forage production potential is low, which means most producers will rely on stored forage and supplement to meet the nutritional needs of the herd. Initial hay reserves left over from the 2015 season have now been exhausted, and most ar[...]


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  • Posted by: Joyce Tredaway Tredaway on 11/4/2016 1:12 PM

    As Alabama continues with below average rainfall and above average temperatures, the drought is taking its toll on the pastures and hayfields. In drought situations, animals will eat plants that they normally probably wouldn't because of the lack of forage availability. This leads to many animals eating toxic plants that are normally not eaten by them, although they have always been present in the field.  Toxic plants may be foun[...]


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  • Posted by: Kathy Flanders on 9/14/2016 11:28 AM

    It would be nice if we could be done with fall armyworms for the year. But they will be around until the first hard frost. Please keep looking for fall armyworms in your forage crops. On the bright side, as the weather cools down it will take longer for the armyworms to complete a generation.

    I am especially concerned about small grains that are planted early for forage, wildlife, or cover crops, such as wheat, oats, and rye. T[...]


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  • Posted by: Joyce Tredaway Tredaway on 8/31/2016 2:15 PM

    Be sure and tell your forage growers that if they have woody perennials​ (like blackberry) that after August 31, they do not need to mow or bushhog their pastures or hayfields this year.  In order to control woody perennials, they must have at least one year of growth to treat them with a herbicide and be effective. The best time to treat woody perennials is in July-August while they are flowering, so preferably, you wo[...]


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  • Posted by: Kathy Flanders on 8/4/2016 2:34 PM

    I have heard of several damaging chinch bug infestations in the last week.  Two reports were from pearl millet, the other from a mixed stand of grasses that included barnyardgrass.  Small grains, summer annual forage grasses, corn, and turf grasses are all hosts of chinch bugs (Blissus spp.).  Chinch bugs puncture plants with their syringe-like mouth parts and suck out the plant juice.  They tend to feed a[...]


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  • Posted by: Kathy Flanders on 7/27/2015 11:10 AM

    damage small.jpgDamage from bermudagrass stem maggot was reported from Franklin and Cherokee Counties this week.  Damage had previously been reported from Talladega, Marshall, Shelby, Chilton, Chambers, and Barbour Counties.

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  • Posted by: Kathy Flanders on 7/22/2015 6:14 PM

    using sweepnet.jpgThis week cattlemen and extension agents  reported finding damaging populations of fall armyworm in hayfields in 4 counties: Pike, Calhoun, Etowah, and Marshall.  It is best to control fall armyworm caterpillars before they have molted into the last and la[...]


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  • Posted by: Maggie Lawrence on 3/31/2015 1:27 PM


    The American Forage and Grassland Council awarded Dr. Don Ball, alumni professor in the Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Soils at Auburn University, the 2015 Distinguished Grasslander Award at its annual conference in St. Louis.

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